Ty Cobb

Birthdate 12/18/1886
Death Date 7/17/1961
Debut Year 1905
Year of Induction 1936
Teams Athletics, Tigers
Position Center Field

Cobb won 11 consecutive batting crowns and twelve in a 13-year period. His .366 lifetime mark is the best in Major League Baseball history.

 

In the collection:

Ty Cobb's personal check, one of the first autographs in the collection

Ty Cobb's personal check, one of the first autographs in the collection

In the mid 1980’s Ty Cobb’s granddaughter flooded the autograph collectible market with Ty Cobb’s personal checks. Until the end of the decade, these beauties could be had for under $50. This example is made out to a book store and is dated September 5, 1945.
Eddie Wells pitched for the Tigers when Cobb was the manager. Here he reflects on the Georgia Peach.

Eddie Wells pitched for the Tigers when Cobb was the manager. Here he reflects on the Georgia Peach.

Ty Cobb was the Tigers’ skipper when Eddie Wells made his Major League debut just nine days after his 23rd birthday. It was Cobb’s first year as player-manager in Detroit and his 19th in the Major Leagues. Featured here is page one
In the second page of the letter, Wells writes about his own career

In the second page of the letter, Wells writes about his own career

On page two of his letter, Eddie Wells writes about his baseball experiences. “Back in the twenties you had 54 minor leagues – AAA – AA – A – B – C and D. You had 400 Major League players. Now you have around 15 minor leagues and players do not spend much time in
Ty Cobb says,

Ty Cobb says, "Tuxedo has been a great help…" in this original 1916 ad

Tuxedo Tobacco pulled together the greatest baseball players of the day for this advertisement. Hailing itself as, “The Perfect Pipe Tobacco”, Tuxedo secured the services of “Tyrus R. Cobb, Famous Baseball Player”. According to the advertisement, Cobb says, “Tuxedo

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"Whoever wants to know the heart and mind of America had better learn baseball…"

~Jacques Barzun, 1954