Barney Dreyfuss

cooperstownexpert.com
Birthdate 2/23/1865
Death Date 2/5/1932
Debut Year 1890
Year of Induction 2007
Teams Colonels, Pirates
Positions Executive, Owner

As owner of the Pittsburgh Pirates, Barney Dreyfuss presided over teams that won six pennants and two World Series championships.

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In the collection:

Handwritten letter from 1908 - Dreyfuss mentions HoFers Honus Wagner and Fred Clarke

Handwritten letter from 1908 - Dreyfuss mentions HoFers Honus Wagner and Fred Clarke

In the collection is a letter handwritten by Hall of Fame Pirates owner Barney Dreyfuss. Dreyfuss alludes to a feud with newspaper men before closing the letter with an assessment of his team’s fortunes for the upcoming 1908 season. “With Fred (Clarke), Honus (Wagner), and (Tommie) Leach
Pittsburgh second baseman & Renaissance Man Howdy Groskloss recalls Barney Dreyfuss

Pittsburgh second baseman & Renaissance Man Howdy Groskloss recalls Barney Dreyfuss

Howdy Groskloss decided to become a doctor at age 12 when he witnessed the death of his father. As an adult he made good on that decision, becoming a respected gynecologist. Before entering the medical profession Groskloss was an elite college athlete who became a big league player for Barney Dreyfu

A Story about Barney Dreyfuss

Living on America’s frontier cost Deadball Era star Charles “Deacon” Phillippe a chance at Cooperstown

March 29th, 2021 Leave a comment

Pitcher Deacon Phillippe

A career worthy of Cooperstown review Deadball Era star Charles “Deacon” Phillippe pitched in more than 450 professional games in a career that almost never happened. Born less than a decade after the end of the US Civil War, Phillippe grew up on the outskirts of the American frontier, beyond the reach of pro baseball. His big league talent undiscovered, Phillippe had to wait until just before his 27th birthday to throw his first pitch in the majors. Once he reached baseball’s highest level, Phillippe made an immediate impact, topping the 20-win plateau in each of his first five seasons. A control artist, Phillippe’s career walk-per-nine-innings rate is the lowest since the pitching distance moved to 60’6″. Phillippe’s glove work was also top-tier. His career fielding percentage was 23 points above the league average. As a hitter, he topped the .200 mark 8 of his 13 seasons. In 1910 the 39-year old Phillippe became the first pitcher to hit an inside-the-park grand slam. More than a century later Mel Stottlemeyre is the only moundsman to match the feat. The forgotten Deadball Era star also has an impressive postseason pedigree. The winner of baseball’s first World Series game, his performance in […]

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"Whoever wants to know the heart and mind of America had better learn baseball…"

~Jacques Barzun, 1954