Bill Doak

Bill Doak CooperstownExpert.com
Birthdate 1/28/1891
Death Date 11/26/1954
Debut Year 1912
Year of Induction
Teams Cardinals, Dodgers, Reds
Positions Innovator, Pitcher

Only Bob Gibson has more shutouts for the Cardinals than Spittin’ Bill Doak who forever changed the way baseball gloves were designed and used.

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In the collection:

Pitcher Bill Doak had a fine MLB career before becoming an innovator for the design of baseball gloves

Pitcher Bill Doak had a fine MLB career before becoming an innovator for the design of baseball gloves

Spitball pitcher Bill Doak enjoyed a 16-year big-league career that spanned from 1912-1929. Over that span, he threw 2,782 2/3 innings, finishing with a 2.98 earned run average. Twice he led the league in the category, posting a 1.72 ERA in 1914 and a 2.59 mark in 1921. Doak reached the 20-win mark
After retiring from the game, Bill Doak coached high school baseball in Bradenton, Florida

After retiring from the game, Bill Doak coached high school baseball in Bradenton, Florida

Upon retiring from the game in 1929, Bill Doak moved to Bradenton Florida where he coached the Bradenton High School baseball team to the state championship. Shown here is the reverse of the Doak-signed government postcard. Notice the US Postal Service postmark of May 30, 1954 from Bradenton Florida. Doak passed away in Bradenton less than six months later
Rawlings diagram detailing the innovations of the Bill Doak model glove

Rawlings diagram detailing the innovations of the Bill Doak model glove

Baseball remains a game steeped in tradition – at times so loyal to the past that positive change is slow to come. The first few decades of glove use in the game featured five distinct fingers of leather protection and nothing else. Players would catch a ball much like you’d catch a quarter – closing your fingers around the coin in the palm of your hand.

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"Whoever wants to know the heart and mind of America had better learn baseball…"

~Jacques Barzun, 1954