Bobby Shantz

Bobby Shantz
Birthdate 9/26/1925
Death Date
Debut Year 1949
Year of Induction
Teams Astros, Athletics, Cardinals, Cubs, Phillies, Yankees
Position Pitcher

Bobby Shantz was 24-7 with a 2.48 ERA as the Most Valuable Player in 1952, the last winning season the Athletics enjoyed in Philadelphia.

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In the collection:

Bobby Shantz was the American League MVP in 1952

Bobby Shantz was the American League MVP in 1952

American League MVP in 1952, Bobby Shantz enjoyed an illustrious big league career. In the collection is this handwritten letter from the All Star pitcher in which he thanks a fan for offering a baseball glove to him. Shantz writes, “I really don’t have any use for a baseball glove anymo
Many men fondly recall player model glove of their childhoods

Many men fondly recall player model glove of their childhoods

Here is the glove to which Bobby Shantz refers in his letter. The 16-year Major Leaguer has signed the leather, personalizing it to former high school phenom Will Smiley. After the Dodgers spearheaded the quarter-million dollar renovation of the baseball field where Jackie Robinson played high schoo
Bobby Shantz played pro baseball for 17 seasons

Bobby Shantz played pro baseball for 17 seasons

The inside of the glove bears a facsimile signature of Bobby Shantz as shown in the image above. Shantz started his professional pitching career in 1948 for the Single-A affiliate of Connie Mack’s Philadelphia Athletics. The following season he made the jump to the big leagues where he pitched
Autographed 1975 Topps card commemorating Bobby Shantz' MVP season

Autographed 1975 Topps card commemorating Bobby Shantz' MVP season

The 1975 Topps baseball card set featured a tribute to the 25 years the company had been in business. Topps produced cards depicting Most Valuable Players from the previous quarter century. In the collection is one such card adorned with the autographs of the 1952
Bobby Shantz started in the big leagues with Connie Mack's Athletics

Bobby Shantz started in the big leagues with Connie Mack's Athletics

When Bobby Shantz broke into the big leagues in 1949 he was under the command of legendary manager Connie Mack. The Tall Tactician held the reigns of his Philadelphia Athletics from their inception as one of the American League’s initial franchises in 1901
Bobby Shantz is an MVP, 7-time Gold Glover, and three-time All Star

Bobby Shantz is an MVP, 7-time Gold Glover, and three-time All Star

Despite a diminutive 5’6″ 139-pound frame, Bobby Shantz loomed large in Major League Baseball for 16 seasons. Signed by Connie Mack’s Philadelphia Athletics before the 1948 season, Shantz played for 7 big league teams. Along the way, Shantz filled his trophy case. In 1951 the lefty
Bobby's brother Billy Shantz was a big league catcher

Bobby's brother Billy Shantz was a big league catcher

The 1955 Bowman baseball card set remains iconic in part because of their “Color TV” design. In the collection is a pair cards from that Bowman production, each with the signature of Bobby Shantz. The card on top is Shantz’ regular-issue card while the one below shows Bobby and his
Though 5'6

Though 5'6", Shantz stood tall among Major League pitchers

In the collection is this pair of horizontal baseball cards of Bobby Shantz signed by the 1952 American League Most Valuable Player. Though Shantz enjoyed his greatest success with Connie Mack and the Philadelphia Athletics, the cards show the hurler later in his career with as a Yankee. Shantz pitc
Bobby Shantz had a career full of highlights

Bobby Shantz had a career full of highlights

A willing signer through autograph requests through the mail, Bobby Shantz signed this 3×5 index card and inscribed it with some of his career highlights. One glance at the card reveals an outstanding big league career. “1952 MVP”, “3 All Star Games”, “3 World Series”, “A.L. Leader ERA, 1957 2.45”.

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