Monty Stratton

Monty Stratton cooperstownexpert.com
Birthdate 5/21/1912
Death Date 9/29/1982
Debut Year 1934
Year of Induction
Teams White Sox
Position Pitcher

Jimmy Stewart portrayed Monty Stratton in 1949’s “The Stratton Story” that won the Academy Award for Best Writing, Motion Picture Story.

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In the collection:

Heilbroner Baseball Bureau information card filled out and signed by Monty Stratton before his MLB debut

Heilbroner Baseball Bureau information card filled out and signed by Monty Stratton before his MLB debut

Monte Stratton hand picked Jimmy Stewart to portray him in the 1949 Academy Award winning film, “The Stratton Story”. The love story was based on the pitcher’s life, centering around his relationship with his wife. It featured his rise to the big leagues and the hunting accident th
Reverse of Heilbroner card signed by Monty Stratton with newspaper article about hunting accident

Reverse of Heilbroner card signed by Monty Stratton with newspaper article about hunting accident

The back of the card has more information about Monty Stratton including a short newspaper article. Resembling a library card from a bygone era, the card lists the teams for which Stratton played. The newspaper story reads in part, “Baseball offered a lifetime job Saturday to Monty Stratton, the ace White Sox pitcher who recently underwent amputation
Metro Goldwyn Mayer contract signed by Bill Dickey to appear in The Stratton Story

Metro Goldwyn Mayer contract signed by Bill Dickey to appear in The Stratton Story

Monty Stratton’s courageous comeback after the 1938 amputation of his right leg captivated the country. An All Star in 1937 Stratton won 15 games in both’37 and ’38. After the amputation Stratton made it back to pitching professionally, throwing in the minor leagues until 1953. In 1948 while the hurler was still active, MGM Studios produced a full-length feature film. Jimmy Stewart

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~Jacques Barzun, 1954