Babe Dahlgren

cooperstownexpert.com
Birthdate 06/15/1912
Death Date 09/04/1996
Debut Year 1935
Year of Induction
Teams Browns, Cubs, Dodgers, Phillies, Pirates, Red Sox, Yankees
Position First Base

Remembered as the man who replaced Lou Gehrig on 5/2/1939 to end the streak, Babe Dahlgren was an All Star with over 1,000 career hits.

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In the collection:

1937 letter from HoFer George Weiss mentioning Dahlgren as a replacement for Gehrig

1937 letter from HoFer George Weiss mentioning Dahlgren as a replacement for Gehrig

As head of the Yankees’ from 1932-1947, George Weiss intimately knew the inner workings of the team’s farm system and its minor leaguers. Here he writes to super scout Joe Devine about various personnel issues. First among them in the letter was Babe Dahlgren who had yet to play a game f
Page two of the Weiss letter

Page two of the Weiss letter

Weiss who would serve as the Yankee general manager from 1947-1960 signed many contracts, documents, and letters, making his signature common. However, the foreshadowing of Babe Dahlgren serving as eventual replacement for the Iron Horse makes this letter rather remarkable. The letter also mentions pitcher Spud Chandler, the eventual AL MVP in 1943, and Tommy Henrich
Agreement assigning Babe Dahlgren to Boston's minor league club in Jersey City signed by HoFer Eddie Collins

Agreement assigning Babe Dahlgren to Boston's minor league club in Jersey City signed by HoFer Eddie Collins

Babe Dahlgren originally broke in with the Boston Red Sox in 1935. This document, dated January 28, 1936 assigns the 24-year old first baseman to the Jersey City team in Boston’s minor league system. It is signed at the bottom by Hall of Fame
1939 Play Ball card from the season Babe Dahlgren replaced Lou Gehrig

1939 Play Ball card from the season Babe Dahlgren replaced Lou Gehrig

Later in life Dahlgren was the target of autograph collectors who sought the signature of the man who replaced Lou Gehrig. A willing signer through the mail, Dahlgren enjoyed a 12-year career with eight different ball clubs. Here is an autographed original Play Ball card from 1939, the year Babe Dahlgren replaced
1935 Draper-Maynard Athletic Goods endorsement contract, three months after MLB debut

1935 Draper-Maynard Athletic Goods endorsement contract, three months after MLB debut

Babe Dahlgren made his Major League debut on April 16, 1935 for the Boston Red Sox. Draper-Maynard Athletic Goods signed him to this endorsement deal three months later with this contract dated July 15, 1935. Per the deal, Dahlgren would receive “baseball gloves or mitts made to his specifications,
Photograph from Who's Who in Baseball signed by Lou Gehrig

Photograph from Who's Who in Baseball signed by Lou Gehrig

Babe Dahlgren gained baseball immortality when he became forever linked to Lou Gehrig by starting in place of the Iron Horse on May 2, 1939. In the collection is a photo signed by Gehrig as he joins forces with Hall of Fame catcher Bill Dickey to argue a call with umpire Cal Hubbard, the only man inducted into both the baseball and football Halls of
Dahlgren stopped Gehrig's streak; here's a contract from 1925 when Gehrig's streak started

Dahlgren stopped Gehrig's streak; here's a contract from 1925 when Gehrig's streak started

Many baseball fans know that Lou Gehrig’s consecutive games played streak was halted when Babe Dahlgren’s name was penciled onto the Yankee starting lineup in May of 1939. What most folks don’t know is how Gehrig’s streak began in 1925. Light-hitting Pee Wee Wanninger
Signature page for Wanninger's 1925 contract - also signed by HoF Yankee owner Jacob Ruppert

Signature page for Wanninger's 1925 contract - also signed by HoF Yankee owner Jacob Ruppert

As stated in the previous piece’s description, Pee Wee Wanninger is the man for whom Lou Gehrig pinch hit to begin the Iron Horse’s consecutive games played streak. Shown here is the signature page for Wanninger’s 1925 player’s contract. Hall of Fame Yankee owner Jacob Ruppert has signed

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"Whoever wants to know the heart and mind of America had better learn baseball…"

~Jacques Barzun, 1954