Spud Chandler

Supd Chandler autograph
Birthdate 09/12/1907
Death Date 01/09/1990
Debut Year 1937
Year of Induction
Teams Yankees
Position Pitcher

Spud Chandler finished with a career record of 109-43 good for a .717 winning %, the highest since 1876 for any pitcher with at least 100 wins.

Be sure to visit our page on Facebook.

Leave a comment

In the collection:

Spud Chandler won the 1943 Most Valuable Player Award

Spud Chandler won the 1943 Most Valuable Player Award

Spud Chandler won a league-leading 20 games in 1943 on his way to winning the American League Most Valuable Player Award. His season was dominant — he led the AL in wins, ERA, shutouts, complete games, and winning percentage. Shown here is Chandler’s player’s contract for the 1945
Spud Chandler made four AL All Star teams from 1942-1947

Spud Chandler made four AL All Star teams from 1942-1947

Just two seasons removed from his 1943 Most Valuable Player season, Spud Chandler signed this contract with the New York Yankees. An All Star in four of his eleven years, Chandler enlisted into the US Army after just one start in 1944. After spending nearly two years away from the game, Chandler ret
Spud Chandler's career record is 109-43 with a 2.84 ERA

Spud Chandler's career record is 109-43 with a 2.84 ERA

The signature page contains that of Chandler and of Hall of Famer Larry MacPhail. A longtime executive, MacPhail was the General Manager of the Reds before assuming the same position along with the title of president for the Brooklyn Dodgers. After accepting a commission in the army, MacPhail stayed
Chandler missed two seasons because of World War II

Chandler missed two seasons because of World War II

As part of the “Regulations” page the contract stipulates, “The Player must keep himself in first-class physical condition and must at all times conform his personal conduct to standards of good citizenship and sportsmanship.” Particularly of interest here is that the club &#

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

"Whoever wants to know the heart and mind of America had better learn baseball…"

~Jacques Barzun, 1954