Clark Griffith

CooperstownExpert.com
Birthdate 11/20/1869
Death Date 10/27/1955
Debut Year 1891
Year of Induction 1946
Teams Browns, Cubs, Reds, Senators, White Sox, Yankees
Positions Executive, Manager, Owner, Pitcher

The first skipper of the Yankees, Clark Griffith won 237-games and is the only person to serve 20+ years as an MLB player, manager, and owner.

Be sure to visit our page on Facebook.

Leave a comment

In the collection:

Clark Griffith managed the first AL champion in 1901; he was also their mound ace

Clark Griffith managed the first AL champion in 1901; he was also their mound ace

Before becoming a Hall of Fame executive as the owner of the Washington Senators, Clark Griffith was a 237-game winner as a big league pitcher. From 1894-1900 Griffith won 151 games for the National League’s Chicago Colts, eclipsing the 20-win plateau six times in seven years. Griffith was quite a
Griffith bought controlling interest in the Senators in October, 1913 & owned them until his death in 1955

Griffith bought controlling interest in the Senators in October, 1913 & owned them until his death in 1955

Clark Griffith had a 20-year big league pitching career to remember. After debuting in 1891 with the American Association’s St. Louis Browns, he mixed in seven 20-win seasons on his way to 237 career victories. Griffith also had a 20-year managerial career. His highlights include piloting the
Griffith ruled day-day-day operations of the Senators throughout his 45-year ownership

Griffith ruled day-day-day operations of the Senators throughout his 45-year ownership

As owner of the Washington Senators, Clark Griffith fielded many offers for trades. In this letter of November 29, 1926 Griffith writes to fellow Hall of Famer Eddie Collins expressing his sorrow that Collins was deposed as manager of the White Sox. With Collins as their second baseman and manager C
Captain Buddy Lewis flew 369 missions in WWII; he named his plane

Captain Buddy Lewis flew 369 missions in WWII; he named his plane "The Old Fox"

Buddy Lewis broke in with Clark Griffith’s Senators in 1935 and played for Washington throughout his 11-year career. Lewis had an outstanding run before becoming a World War II pilot. From his first full season in 1936 until 1941 when he left the Senators for the war, Lewis hit over .300 three
As Washington owner, Clark Griffith presented annual AL passes to presidents for decades

As Washington owner, Clark Griffith presented annual AL passes to presidents for decades

This letter, between two Hall of Famers represents the intersection between baseball and politics. Signed by William Harridge and dated March 29, 1955, this correspondence is written to Washington Senators owner and Hall of Fame member Clark Griffith. Harridge informs
Commanders in Chief often hosted Clark Griffith as Washington Senators owner

Commanders in Chief often hosted Clark Griffith as Washington Senators owner

A smiling 85-year-old Clark Griffith poses with Ike after giving the president a pass for all American League games for the 1955 season. Voted into the Hall of Fame in 1946 Griffith posted six consecutive 20-win seasons as a Cubs from 1894-1901. His career as a player, manager, and executive

Stories about Clark Griffith

Buddy Lewis was on his way to Cooperstown before World War II

September 7th, 2021 Leave a comment

Buddy Lewis

Buddy Lewis broke into the big leagues at age 19, was a regular by age 20, and an All Star by age 21.

When the infielder recorded his 1,000th career hit on June 4, 1941 he was just 24 years old.

Only four players in major league history reached the 1,000-hit plateau at a younger age. All are in the Hall of Fame – Ty Cobb, Mel Ott, Al Kaline, and Freddie Lindstrom – are in the Hall of Fame.

The Senators third baseman was one of baseball rising young stars. Lewis was on the path to Cooperstown.

Then everything changed.

Lewis enlisted into the army to fight in World War II. Flying a C-47 that he named “The Old Fox” in honor of Senators owner Clark Griffith, Lewis survived more than 350 missions.

When he returned to the game after a 3 1/2 year absence, he was a different man and a different player.

With all that he saw during the war, baseball took on less significance.

Though he had some success, Lewis was out of baseball by age 34.

Once a man on the path to Cooperstown, Lewis answered the call to serve his country.

This is the story of Senators great and World War II hero Buddy Lewis.

Read More >

Military service in WWI deprived Sam Rice of the 13 hits he needed for 3,000

July 13th, 2021 Leave a comment

Sam Rice Washington Senators

The historical marker near Sam Rice’s hometown of Morocco, Indiana reads, “Drafted into the Army in WWI. Rice missed most of the 1918 season. He helped Washington win American League pennants in 1924, 1925, and 1933, and a World Series title in 1924. Over 20 seasons he was often among league leaders in hits and steals. He played his last year in 1934 with the Cleveland Indians, finishing with a career .322 batting average and 2,877 hits.”

Rice remains largely forgotten today.

The Washington Senators became the Minnesota Twins. Today no team or fan base embraces Rice. He finished just 13 hits shy of the 3,000-hit milestone.

Sam Rice is one of baseball’s forgotten stars.

Read More >

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

"Whoever wants to know the heart and mind of America had better learn baseball…"

~Jacques Barzun, 1954