Cy Young

Birthdate 3/29/1867
Death Date 11/4/1955
Debut Year 1890
Year of Induction 1937
Teams Americans, Cardinals, Naps, Perfectos, Red Sox, Rustlers, Spiders
Position Pitcher

Cy Young remains #1 in MLB history in games started, innings, complete games, wins, & losses. His 511 victories are 94 more than #2 on the list.

In the collection:

Ball signed by Cy Young and others from 1st World Series reunion

Ball signed by Cy Young and others from 1st World Series reunion

The inaugural World Series in 1903 featured the Boston Americans — renamed the Red Sox in 1907 — and the Pittsburgh Pirates. In 1953 baseball decided to have a Golden Jubilee in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Series. In the collection is a baseball signed at that reunion
Second autographed panel of the Golden Jubilee ball

Second autographed panel of the Golden Jubilee ball

The other four signatures on the ball commemorating the 50th anniversary of the first World Series are shown here. Hall of Fame Pirate left fielder and manager Fred Clarke has signed at the top of the quartet. Still the Pittsburgh franchise record holder for wins by a manager, Clarke guided his team
Autographed Baseball Magazine from May, 1932

Autographed Baseball Magazine from May, 1932

Denton True “Cy” Young won an astounding 511 games in his remarkable 22-year Hall of Fame career. He remains baseball’s all-time leader in wins, losses, starts, complete games, innings pitched, and batters faced. In 1956, Major League Baseball began the Cy Young Award. From 1956-19
Bob Feller signed photo pictured with Cy Young

Bob Feller signed photo pictured with Cy Young

Cy Young pitched from 1890-1911 and won 511 games. When Young died in 1955 baseball commissioner Ford Frick decided to annually honor the best pitcher in the big leagues with the Cy Young Award. From 1956-1966 one award was given for both leagues. In 1967 baseball switched gears and recognized one p

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"Whoever wants to know the heart and mind of America had better learn baseball…"

~Jacques Barzun, 1954