Enos Slaughter

Enos Slaughter cooperstownexpert.com
Birthdate 4/27/1916
Death Date 8/12/2002
Debut Year 1938
Year of Induction 1985
Teams Athletics, Braves, Cardinals, Yankees
Position Right Field

After All Star appearances in 1941 & 1942, Enos Slaughter missed 1943-1945 due to WWII. When he returned, he made 8 straight All Star games.

In the collection:

Enos Slaughter's first passport - for 1953 MLB goodwill tour of Japan

Enos Slaughter's first passport - for 1953 MLB goodwill tour of Japan

Baseball in Japan was originally imported from the United States via a number of goodwill tours of American ballplayers. Lefty O’Doul is often referred to as the Father of Japanese Baseball in large part because of the visits he coordinated as manager of the San Francisco Seals in 1949, ’50, and
First two pages inside Enos Slaughter's first passport

First two pages inside Enos Slaughter's first passport

Enos Slaughter made his big league debut in 1938 and was an All Star by 1941. The following season he was again an All Star, leading the National League in hits, triples, and total bases while finishing second in MVP balloting. His Cardinals beat the Yankees in the World Series to give Slaughter the
The Hall of Famer signs his full name on this page

The Hall of Famer signs his full name on this page

Enos Slaughter’s crowning moment was his “Mad Dash” in the 1946 World Series against the Boston Red Sox. In the eighth inning of Game 7 with the score tied 3-3, Slaughter led off with a single. With two out he was still on first, no closer to scoring. Up came Harry Walker. With a h
Picture of Enos Slaughter's inside his passport

Picture of Enos Slaughter's inside his passport

This page has a picture of the 37-year old Enos Slaughter who just completed 13th big league season, all with the Cardinals. It was also his 10th and final All Star season. Just five months after the trip to Japan, Slaughter was traded to the Yankees where he joined Japan travel mates Ed Lopat and Y
Visa for entrance into Japan in Enos Slaughter's first passport

Visa for entrance into Japan in Enos Slaughter's first passport

This page features the Japanese entrance via dated October 16, 1953, just eight days after the Yankees beat the Brooklyn Dodgers in the World Series. The visa is good for one year from the issue date. The page shows writing in Japanese. The ensuing pages (not shown) have additional markings as Slaug
International Certificate of Inoculation and Vaccination for Enos Slaughter

International Certificate of Inoculation and Vaccination for Enos Slaughter

At the time of the trip, travelers were required to get inoculated against yellow fever, a disease spread by mosquitoes. Here is Enos Slaughter’s certificate of inoculation. The document is issued by the Federal Security Agency, a US Public Health Service. Slaughter has filled out
Inside of the Certificate of Vaccination against smallpox

Inside of the Certificate of Vaccination against smallpox

Shown here are the two pages inside the Certificate of Inoculation and Vaccination. Slaughter has signed this three additional times. Known for his constant hustle, Slaughter served as a role model for Pete Rose‘s style of play. As a Reds rookie Rose recalled a childhood memory of Slaughter, &
1948 Autoball contract signed by Enos Slaughter

1948 Autoball contract signed by Enos Slaughter

By the time Enos Slaughter signed this contract in 1948 he was already a four-time All Star and two-time World Champion. His career was far from over. Slaughter would go on to appear in six more Mid Summer Classics and earn two more World Series rings. Here he agrees to have his signature appear on
Enos Slaughter 3x5 cards with inscription

Enos Slaughter 3x5 cards with inscription

In this pair of index cards, Enos Slaughter writes his career highlights and offers his autograph. Slaughter writes, “Played 19 years, .300 lifetime average, 10 All Star Games, five World Series, 4 World Champions”. The card below that is dated 9-6-91 before Slaughter has added “Best wishes” and his signature.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

"Whoever wants to know the heart and mind of America had better learn baseball…"

~Jacques Barzun, 1954