Chub Feeney

Chub Feeney enjoys a dinner with Willie Mays
Birthdate08/31/1921
Death Date01/10/1994
Debut Year1946
Year of Induction
Teams Giants, National League, Padres
Positions Executive, League President

Charles Stoneham “Chub” Feeney was the grandson of New York Giants owner Charles Stoneham. Feeney was National League President from 1970-1986.

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In the collection:

Chub Feeney spent from 1946-1969 in the Giants front office then ascended to the American League presidency

Chub Feeney spent from 1946-1969 in the Giants front office then ascended to the American League presidency

Charles Stoneham bought the Giants for $1 million in 1919 and owned the club until he died in 1938. His son Horace Stoneham assumed the reigns upon Charles death and owned the club until 1976. The elder Stoneham’s grandson, Charles “Chub” Feeney was intimately involved with the Gia
Chub Feeney spent more than 40 years as a Major League executive; 17 as National League president

Chub Feeney spent more than 40 years as a Major League executive; 17 as National League president

After a successful run of three NL pennants and a World Champ in the Giants front office, Chub Feeney took over as president of the National League. For the next 17 years Feeney faithfully served the National League. As the NL chief, Feeney signed player correspondence including contracts. In this capacity Feeney signed the contract above. Dated February 2, 1971,
Signature pages of contracts offer collectors examples of multiple autographs

Signature pages of contracts offer collectors examples of multiple autographs

Contracts provide an outstanding way for collectors to gain signatures. On this page, the autographs of three men can be found. Dodger pitcher Joe Moeller has signed the document. This was the final big league contract of Moeller’s career. After retiring as a player, Moeller remained in the game as a member of the Dodgers’ speaker’s bureau and later as the
As National League President, Chub Feeney congratulated many NL players; here's a telegram to Pete Rose

As National League President, Chub Feeney congratulated many NL players; here's a telegram to Pete Rose

The Reds brought Pete Rose home from Montreal in a trade on August 17, 1984. Cincinnati immediately install Rose as the team’s player/manager. Rose penciled himself in the lineup as he worked to surpass Ty Cobb’s record for career hits. Once the Reds acquired Rose, congratulatory corresp
The first season pass the American League for the 1979 season was issued to Chub Feeney and Party

The first season pass the American League for the 1979 season was issued to Chub Feeney and Party

When there was such a position as league president one of their duties was to award season passes to the game’s dignitaries. When Lee MacPhail was the American League president in 1979, the first person to whom he awarded a season pass was his National League counterpart Chub Feeney. That pass is in the collection. Two aspects about
Chub Feeney also received the National League's first pass for '79 - he issued it to himself

Chub Feeney also received the National League's first pass for '79 - he issued it to himself

An outstanding companion piece to the American League pass above is this National League pass from the same season. Not only did Chub Feeney receive the first AL pass issued in 1979, he also made certain that the first NL pass was likewise issued to himself. With both passes, Feeney could attend any Major League game in ’79. Like
Chub Feeney, his daughter Kate, and uncle Horace Stoneham all received the William J. Slocum Award

Chub Feeney, his daughter Kate, and uncle Horace Stoneham all received the William J. Slocum Award

The New York chapter of the Baseball Writers Association of America created the William J. Slocum Award in 1930. It recognizes those with a long and meritorious service to baseball. Since its inception, the award has been bestowed upon some of the greatest players and most influential people in the

A Story about Chub Feeney

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"Whoever wants to know the heart and mind of America had better learn baseball…"

~Jacques Barzun, 1954