Chub Feeney

Chub Feeney enjoys a dinner with Willie Mays
Birthdate 08/31/1921
Death Date 01/10/1994
Debut Year 1946
Year of Induction
Teams Giants, National League, Padres
Positions Executive, League President

Charles Stoneham “Chub” Feeney was the grandson of New York Giants owner Charles Stoneham. Feeney was National League President from 1970-1986.

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In the collection:

Chub Feeney spent from 1946-1969 in the Giants front office then ascended to the American League presidency

Chub Feeney spent from 1946-1969 in the Giants front office then ascended to the American League presidency

Charles Stoneham bought the Giants for $1 million in 1919 and owned the club until he died in 1938. His son Horace Stoneham assumed the reigns upon Charles death and owned the club until 1976. The elder Stoneham’s grandson, Charles “Chub” Feeney was intimately involved with the Gia
Chub Feeney spent more than 40 years as a Major League executive; 17 as National League president

Chub Feeney spent more than 40 years as a Major League executive; 17 as National League president

After a successful run of three NL pennants and a World Champ in the Giants front office, Chub Feeney took over as president of the National League. For the next 17 years Feeney faithfully served the National League. As the NL chief, Feeney signed player correspondence including contracts. In this capacity Feeney signed the contract above. Dated February 2, 1971,
Signature pages of contracts offer collectors examples of multiple autographs

Signature pages of contracts offer collectors examples of multiple autographs

Contracts provide an outstanding way for collectors to gain signatures. On this page, the autographs of three men can be found. Dodger pitcher Joe Moeller has signed the document. This was the final big league contract of Moeller’s career. After retiring as a player, Moeller remained in the game as a member of the Dodgers’ speaker’s bureau and later as the
Feeney's National League dominated the AL in All Star competition

Feeney's National League dominated the AL in All Star competition

Back before interleague play, players and executives took great pride in their individual leagues. The NL, formed in 1876 was called the “Senior Circuit”. For decades the Junior Circuit American League felt it was in the shadow of it’s older brother, the NL. During Chub Feeney̵
1973 was a celebration of the 40th anniversary of MLB's first All Star Game in 1933

1973 was a celebration of the 40th anniversary of MLB's first All Star Game in 1933

Major League Baseball’s first All Star Game was played in 1933. Played on July 6 at Comiskey Park, it was part of the 1933 Chicago’s centennial celebration during the World’s Fair. Babe Ruth hit the game’s first home run in the third inning. Twenty of the 36 players on the ro
The first season pass the American League for the 1979 season was issued to Chub Feeney and Party

The first season pass the American League for the 1979 season was issued to Chub Feeney and Party

When there was such a position as league president one of their duties was to award season passes to the game’s dignitaries. When Lee MacPhail was the American League president in 1979, the first person to whom he awarded a season pass was his National League counterpart Chub Feeney. That pass is in the collection. Two aspects about
Chub Feeney also received the National League's first pass for '79 - he issued it to himself

Chub Feeney also received the National League's first pass for '79 - he issued it to himself

An outstanding companion piece to the American League pass above is this National League pass from the same season. Not only did Chub Feeney receive the first AL pass issued in 1979, he also made certain that the first NL pass was likewise issued to himself. With both passes, Feeney could attend any Major League game in ’79. Like
Chub Feeney, daughter Kate & uncle Horace Stoneham received the William J. Slocum Award

Chub Feeney, daughter Kate & uncle Horace Stoneham received the William J. Slocum Award

The New York chapter of the Baseball Writers Association of America created the William J. Slocum Award in 1930. It recognizes those with a long and meritorious service to baseball. Since its inception, the award has been bestowed upon some of the greatest players and most influential people in the
As National League President, Chub Feeney congratulated many NL players; here's a telegram to Pete Rose

As National League President, Chub Feeney congratulated many NL players; here's a telegram to Pete Rose

The Reds brought Pete Rose home from Montreal in a trade on August 17, 1984. Cincinnati immediately install Rose as the team’s player/manager. Rose penciled himself in the lineup as he worked to surpass Ty Cobb’s record for career hits. Once the Reds acquired Rose, congratulatory corresp

A Story about Chub Feeney

The William J. Slocum Award is one of MLB’s most prestigious honors

October 3rd, 2020 Leave a comment

William J. Slocum Award

The oldest professional sport in the United States, baseball remains America’s National Pastime to this day. The game’s current leagues were flourishing soon after the end of the 1800s. Every city with a team had multiple newspapers reporting their games. Sportswriters worked from stadium press boxes describing their team’s contests in great detail. The widespread news coverage helped grow the game.
In 1908 writers banded together to form the Baseball Writers Association of America. The BBWAA’s founding mission was to “ensure professional working conditions for beat writers at all MLB ballparks and to promote uniformity of scoring methods.
Early in the 1900s New York City boasted three big league teams, the Giants and Dodgers of the National League, and the Highlanders – who later became the Yankees – in the American League. The Big Apple soon became the hub of the baseball world.
One of the writers who covered the New York teams was William J. Slocum. Respected for his baseball knowledge and writing ability, Slocum quickly rose to the top of his profession. Well-liked, he helped organize the New York chapter of the BBWAA.
The Bill Slocom Award is one of the most prestigious awards baseball has to offer. The little-known honor has been given to more than 50 members of the Hall of Fame.

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"Whoever wants to know the heart and mind of America had better learn baseball…"

~Jacques Barzun, 1954