Jim Delsing

cooperstownexpert.com
Birthdate 11/13/1925
Death Date 5/4/2006
Debut Year 1948
Year of Induction
Teams Athletics, Browns, Tigers, White Sox, Yankees
Positions Center Field, Left Field, Pinch Runner, Right Field

Jim Delsing pinch ran for Eddie Gaedel in 1951. Al Kaline made his big league debut when he replaced Delsing in the 6th inning on June 25, 1953.

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In the collection:

Government postcard signed by Jim Delsing three months before he pinch-runs for Eddie Gaedel in 1951

Government postcard signed by Jim Delsing three months before he pinch-runs for Eddie Gaedel in 1951

Jim Delsing enjoyed more than a decade as a big league player, suiting up for five teams from 1948-1960. Though he played in nearly 1,000 Major League games, he is primarily remembered for being the man who pinch ran for 3’7″ Eddie Gaedel. When Bill Veeck bought the St. Louis Browns in 1
Reverse of Jim Delsing signed government postcard with US Postal postmark on May 19, 1951

Reverse of Jim Delsing signed government postcard with US Postal postmark on May 19, 1951

Signed government postcards offer insight and context for collectors seeking to ensure an autograph’s authenticity. Notice the postmark in the image above dated May 19, 1951, with a Washington DC location. Collectors would send an envelope to ball players with a fan letter and self-addressed s
Once Gaedel reached first base, Jim Delsing pinch ran for him

Once Gaedel reached first base, Jim Delsing pinch ran for him

After Eddie Gaedel walked Browns’ manager Zack Taylor lifted the 3’7″ player and replaced him with Jim Delsing. Here Delsing has autographed an index card and added the notation, “Pinch Runner for Eddie Gaedel Aug 1950”. Delsing’s memory was a bit hazy as he’s off on the date by a year. A veteran of more than a decade in the big leagues, Delsing passed
In his MLB debut 18-year old Al Kaline was a defensive replacement for Delsing

In his MLB debut 18-year old Al Kaline was a defensive replacement for Delsing

Shown here is a 1951 Bowman reprint baseball card autographed by Jim Delsing, the pinch runner for Eddie Gaedel. The outfielder also -played a part in the big league debut of Al Kaline when the future Hall of Famer replaced him in center field in his first big league appearance. Delsing’s professi
Bill Veeck's most famous shenanigan - 3'7

Bill Veeck's most famous shenanigan - 3'7" pinch hitter Eddie Gaedel

Bill Veeck was known as a showman who pushed the envelope with his promotions and publicity stunts. Perhaps his most famous stunt was the signing of 3’7″ Eddie Gaedel. The diminutive Gaedel walked in his only Major League plate appearance on August 19, 1951. Here Veeck signs a
Bob Cain had the distinction of pitching to Gaedel - here's Cain's Christmas card

Bob Cain had the distinction of pitching to Gaedel - here's Cain's Christmas card

Imagine the surprise on the face of pitcher Bob Cain when 3’7″ Eddie Gaedel stepped to the plate with bat in hand. Working with a minute strike zone, Cain walked Gaedel on four pitcher. Cain went 37-44 with a 4.50 ERA in five big league seasons from 1949-1953. He played for the Tigers when he fa
Bob Cain

Bob Cain "I pitched to Eddie Gaedel" autographed index card

Mostly remembered for the day he pitched to Eddie Gaedel, Bob Cain was a five-year big league veteran who pitched in 140 Major League games. Here is a 3×5 card signed by Cain in which he adds the notation, “I pitched to Eddie Gaedel”. A willing signer through the mail, Cain died in 1997.
Frank Saucier started in right field and batted lead off before getting lifted in favor of Gaedel

Frank Saucier started in right field and batted lead off before getting lifted in favor of Gaedel

Frank Saucier could barely lift his arm the day that Eddie Gaedel played his lone Major League game. Nevertheless, Saucier’s name was penciled in batting lead off and playing right field. After an uneventful top of the first, Saucier was due to bat first for the Browns.

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