Bill Veeck

cooperstownexpert.com
Birthdate 2/9/1914
Death Date 1/2/1986
Debut Year
Year of Induction 1991
Teams Browns, White Sox
Position Executive

Bil Veeck served as owner and team president for the Indians, Browns, and White Sox. His signing of Larry Doby broke the AL color barrier in 1947.

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In the collection:

Larry Doby signed with Bill Veeck's Indians on 7/2/47 and broke the AL color barrier 3 days later

Larry Doby signed with Bill Veeck's Indians on 7/2/47 and broke the AL color barrier 3 days later

When Jackie Robinson debuted for the Dodgers on April 15, 1947, he broke baseball’s color barrier. On July 2nd the same year, Indians owner Bill Veeck helped integrate the American by signing Negro League star Larry Doby. Seeing what Jackie Robinson was going through, Veeck knew what was ahead
Doby enjoyed 7 straight All Star campaigns for the Indians from 1949-1955

Doby enjoyed 7 straight All Star campaigns for the Indians from 1949-1955

Larry Doby left the Newark Eagles after the July 2nd contest. At the time of his departure he led the Eagles in most offensive categories. In 30 games played his numbers included 8 homers, 41 RBI, a .354 average, .438 on-base percentage, and a .743 slugging mark. Doby played in 29 games for the Tr
Veeck's press conference introducing Doby went long so Feller sent his wife this telegram

Veeck's press conference introducing Doby went long so Feller sent his wife this telegram

According to the Hall of Fame’s website, Feller once said of Doby, “He was a great American, he served the country in World War II, and he was a great ballplayer. He was kind of like Buzz Aldrin, the second man on the moon, because he was the second African-American player in the majors behind
Bill Veeck's most famous shenanigan - 3'7

Bill Veeck's most famous shenanigan - 3'7" pinch hitter Eddie Gaedel

Bill Veeck was known as a showman who pushed the envelope with his promotions and publicity stunts. Perhaps his most famous stunt was the signing of 3’7″ Eddie Gaedel. The diminutive Gaedel walked in his only Major League plate appearance on August 19, 1951. Here Veeck signs a 3×5 c
Bob Cain had the distinction of pitching to Gaedel - here's Cain's Christmas card

Bob Cain had the distinction of pitching to Gaedel - here's Cain's Christmas card

Imagine the surprise on the face of pitcher Bob Cain when 3’7″ Eddie Gaedel stepped to the plate with bat in hand. Working with a minute strike zone, Cain walked Gaedel on four pitcher. Later in life, Cain sent out Christmas cards much like the one above. Cain has signed this card as wel
Bob Cain wrote

Bob Cain wrote "I pitched to Eddie Gaedel" on this index card

Mostly remembered for the day he pitched to Eddie Gaedel, Bob Cain was a five-year big league veteran who pitched in 140 Major League games. Here is a 3×5 card signed by Cain in which he adds the notation, “I pitched to Eddie Gaedel”. A willing signer through the mail, Cain died in
Frank Saucier started in right field and batted lead off before getting lifted in favor of Gaedel

Frank Saucier started in right field and batted lead off before getting lifted in favor of Gaedel

Frank Saucier could barely lift his arm the day that Eddie Gaedel played his lone Major League game. Nevertheless, Saucier’s name was penciled in batting lead off and playing right field. After an uneventful top of the first, Saucier was due to bat first for the Browns. It
Once Gaedel reached first base, Jim Delsing pinch ran for him

Once Gaedel reached first base, Jim Delsing pinch ran for him

After Gaedel walked Browns’ manager Zack Taylor lifted the 3’7″ player and replaced him with Jim Delsing. Here Delsing has autographed an index card and added the notation, “Pinch Runner for Eddie Gaedel“. Delsing enjoyed a ten-year career as an outfielder for five teams. He passed away
Autographed 1951 Bowman reprint of Jim Delsing

Autographed 1951 Bowman reprint of Jim Delsing

Shown here is a 1951 Bowman reprint baseball card autographed by Jim Delsing, the pinch runner for Eddie Gaedel. Delsing’s professional baseball career ran from 1942-1960 with ten seasons in the Major Leagues. His final career big league numbers include a .255 average, 40 homers, and 286 runs
Bill Veeck signed letter on St. Louis Browns letterhead

Bill Veeck signed letter on St. Louis Browns letterhead

Maverick baseball owner Bill Veeck bought the St. Louis Browns in 1951 and brought his unorthodox promotions to the forefront in August of the same year when he signed 3’7″ Eddie Gaedel. In this letter, dated less than a year after Gaedel made his famous pinch-hitting appearance, Veeck writes this
Ed Mickelson writes about driving in the final run in St. Louis Browns history

Ed Mickelson writes about driving in the final run in St. Louis Browns history

A charter member of the American League in 1901 as the Milwaukee Brewers, the franchise moved to St. Louis after the 1901 season. They remained in St. Louis as the Browns for 52 years. Hall of Fame executive Bill Veeck owned the St. Louis Browns in their final three seasons
Bill Veeck praises rookie manager Tony La Russa

Bill Veeck praises rookie manager Tony La Russa

Bill Veeck gave Hall of Fame manager Tony La Russa his first big league job when he hired him to pilot the White Sox on August 3, 1979. Sox owner Bill Veeck wrote this letter to a fan the day after La Russa gained win #14 on his way to 2,728 career victories. Veeck writes, “Like you, we feel Tony La Russa is doing a fine job and
Veeck's father Bill Sr. receives a book and a greeting from AG Spalding

Veeck's father Bill Sr. receives a book and a greeting from AG Spalding

In the collection is an autographed page taken from Albert Goodwill Spalding’s book, “America’s National Game”. It is signed, “To Mr. Wm. L Veeck with compliments of AG Spalding, New York, Oct. 21, 1911”. The man it’s inscribed to is Bill Veeck Sr., father of the Hall of Fame owner w
Anti-establishment owner Veeck was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1991

Anti-establishment owner Veeck was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1991

With all the shenanigans Bill Veeck came up with, fellow owners Bill Veeck often anger his fellow owners with the different stunts he pulled. Despite their feelings, the showman gained baseball’s highest honor when he was posthumously inducted into the Hall of Fame. Pictured here is an invitat

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