Larry Doby

Larry Doby
Birthdate 12/13/1924
Death Date 6/18/2003
Debut Year 1947
Year of Induction 1998
Teams Indians, Tigers, White Sox
Position Center Field

Seven-time All Star Larry Doby broke the American League’s color barrier when he debuted for the Cleveland Indians on July 5, 1947.

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In the collection:

Bob Feller wrote this letter the day first Larry Doby put on a big league uniform

Bob Feller wrote this letter the day first Larry Doby put on a big league uniform

It’s difficult today to imagine Major League Baseball excluding player based on the color of their skin. That’s just what MLB did until 1947 when Jackie Robinson and Larry Doby integrated the National and American Leagues. Indians owner Bill Veeck purchased Doby’s services from Eff
Larry Doby was in the midst of a career year when the Indians purchased his contract

Larry Doby was in the midst of a career year when the Indians purchased his contract

Larry Doby left the Newark Eagles after the July 2nd contest. At the time of his departure he led the Eagles in most offensive categories. In 30 games played his numbers included 8 homers, 41 RBI, a .354 average, .438 on-base percentage, and a .743 slugging mark. His first year in Cleveland Doby pla
Feller stayed in close touch with his wife Virginia throughout the '47 season

Feller stayed in close touch with his wife Virginia throughout the '47 season

According to the Hall of Fame’s website, Feller once said of Doby, “He was a great American, he served the country in World War II, and he was a great ballplayer. He was kind of like Buzz Aldrin, the second man on the moon, because he was the second African-American player in the majors
The White Sox released Doby in 1959, spelling an end to his MLB playing career

The White Sox released Doby in 1959, spelling an end to his MLB playing career

Larry Doby played his last Major League game on July 26, 1959 at Comiskey Park against the Orioles. His final big league at bat came as a pinch hitter in the 8th inning against 209-game winner Milt Pappas. Doby struck out. Twenty-five days later, the White Sox sent him to their Triple-A club in San
Doby's stay in Triple-A was ended when he broke his ankle sliding into third base

Doby's stay in Triple-A was ended when he broke his ankle sliding into third base

Three days after his demotion to Triple-A, Doby broke his ankle sliding into third base. The next day the team released him. Shown here is a document outlining the termination of his contract with San Diego. Dated August 24, 1959, the correspondence ends the Padres’ financial responsibility to
Doby broke the American League's color barrier for managers in 1978

Doby broke the American League's color barrier for managers in 1978

After spending time in the minors in 1959, Doby worked out with the Chisox during Spring Training of 1960 but did not earn a roster spot. When Chicago broke camp and opened their season at Comiskey Park against the Kansas City Athletics, they also gave Doby his outright release. This document, dated
After leaving the field, Doby remained active an an big league executive

After leaving the field, Doby remained active an an big league executive

Even after leaving MLB as a player, coach, and manager, Larry Doby remained active in the game. He worked for MLB helping outside companies that wanted to use former player or MLB trademarks. Many of his tasks including arranging card show appearances and speaking engagements for players. It is in t

2 responses to “Larry Doby”

  1. Reg Smithson says:

    Larry Doby deserves to be recognized on the same level of Jackie Robinson! As the first African-American in the American League, Doby went through all the same things Jackie did in the National League.

  2. Said says:

    I agree in fact Larry Don’t in some ways had it worse because unlike Don’t he didn’t have the support of certain players such as Pee Wee Reese, Carl Erskine, and others.

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