Lefty Gomez

Lefty Gomez Yankees
Birthdate 11/26/1910
Death Date 2/17/1989
Debut Year 1930
Year of Induction 1972
Teams Senators, Yankees
Position Pitcher

Lefty Gomez was selected to play in the inaugural All Star game in 1933, starting a string of appearances in 7 consecutive Mid-Summer Classics.

Leave a comment

In the collection:

Lefty Gomez was 6-0 in seven career World Series starts

Lefty Gomez was 6-0 in seven career World Series starts

Twenty-four year old Lefty Gomez was already an established star by the time Goudey Gum Company printed the card shown above. A 20-game winner in both 1931 and 1932, Gomez appeared in Major League Baseball’s first all-star game in the summer of 1933. He pitched three scoreless innings, giving
Gomez got the win in the first All Star Game in 1933

Gomez got the win in the first All Star Game in 1933

In 1933 Major League Baseball decided to have an All Star Game in Chicago to help celebrate the city’s centennial. The game coincided with the World’s Fair also hosted by the Windy City. Lefty Gomez was tabbed as the starting pitcher for the American League. The Yankee hurler was coming
The American League gave Lefty Gomez annual passes

The American League gave Lefty Gomez annual passes

Imagine having access to free admission to every American League game for you and your party. That’s what Lefty Gomez received with this pass given to him in 1979 as a member of Baseball’s Hall of Fame. A lifelong American Leaguer, Gomez helped the Junior Circuit win five World Series. I
Gomez played with and against the game's greatest players.

Gomez played with and against the game's greatest players.

Lefty Gomez’s New York Yankees were a perennial powerhouse. Winners of five World Series in eight years, the Yankees were among the most talented teams in baseball. Gomez played alongside the likes of Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Bill Dickey and Tony Lazzeri. The Yankee pitching staffs of his era in

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

"Whoever wants to know the heart and mind of America had better learn baseball…"

~Jacques Barzun, 1954