Omar Vizquel

Omar Vizquel
Birthdate 04/24/1967
Death Date
Debut Year 1989
Year of Induction
Teams Blue Jays, Giants, Indians, Mariners, Rangers, White Sox
Position Shortstop

The all-time leader in games played at shortstop, Omar Vizquel won nine consecutive Gold Glove Awards from 1993-2001 and 11 overall.

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In the collection:

Omar Vizquel had a career worthy of consideration by the Hall of Fame

Omar Vizquel had a career worthy of consideration by the Hall of Fame

Only two seasons into his illustrious career when he signed this, Omar Vizquel would end up with a career worthy of consideration of baseball’s highest honor. When he signed the contract in March 1991 he was .230 career hitter with no Gold Gloves or All Star appearances. By the time the contract expired at the end of the 1995 season, Vizquel had established himself as one of the finest
Lineup card from 7/29/1995 - Vizquel turns two of his MLB-record 1,734 career double plays in his 812th big league game

Lineup card from 7/29/1995 - Vizquel turns two of his MLB-record 1,734 career double plays in his 812th big league game

Slick-fielding shortstop Omar Vizquel finished his 24-year big league career with an MLB-record 1,734 double plays, 144 more than second-place Ozzie Smith. The 11-time Gold Glover has a strong case for Cooperstown. In the collection is this lineup card filled out and singed by former Indians manag
Venezuela produces great shortstops; here are Davey Concepcion, Omar Vizquel, and Luis Aparacio

Venezuela produces great shortstops; here are Davey Concepcion, Omar Vizquel, and Luis Aparacio

CooperstownExpert.com asked Omar Vizquel about his Venezuela homeland’s ability to produce great shortstops. Click here to see what the 11-time Gold Glover has to say. Vizquel specifically mentions two of his countrymen specifically, Hall of Famer Luis Aparacio and the Big Red Machine’s

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