Rogers Hornsby

Rogers Hornsby
Birthdate 4/27/1896
Death Date 1/5/1963
Debut Year 1915
Year of Induction 1942
Teams Braves, Browns, Cardinals, Cubs, Giants, Reds
Positions Manager, Second Base, Shortstop, Third Base

Rogers Hornsby has a .358 lifetime average – the highest ever for a right-handed hitter. A 7-time batting champ, Hornsby hit over .400 three times.

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Rogers Hornsby is the greatest right-handed hitter in baseball history

Rogers Hornsby is the greatest right-handed hitter in baseball history

Quite simply, Rogers Hornsby is the greatest right-handed hitter in the history of the game. Possessor of the baseball’s highest average among righties, he topped the .400 mark three seasons. Hornsby was simply dominant from 1920-1925, leading the league in average, on-base percentage and slug
Rogers Hornsby completely dominated the decade of the 1920s

Rogers Hornsby completely dominated the decade of the 1920s

Rogers Hornsby’s dominance of the 1920s was profound. For the decade he hit .383 with a .460 on-base percentage and a .637 slugging mark. His yearly averages include 208 hits, 40 doubles, 12 triples, 25 homers, 115 RBI, and 347 total bases. He tallied 6 seasons of double-digit WAR totals and 9

3 responses to “Rogers Hornsby”

  1. Michael says:

    I have a Rogers Hornsby h117 coach’s bat
    1950 Beaumont Roughnecks
    125 H&M’s Louisville slugger
    Genuine
    Reg us patt off
    34inchs long
    H117 stamp on knob
    Used by Hornsby
    With cleat marks and stitch marks
    Rack marks
    Has hash marks on knob that I believe was his and around the knob which I believe was my fathers after he got the bat
    And there is a number written just under knob
    First number could be a 1 a 7 or maybe a 9 I’m not sure but it reads
    ?246
    I can put my dad in ny in 48/49
    And he was also in Beaumont in 1950
    Not sure how he got it but he spoke of him and told me as a child about him having this bat

  2. Jeff Baron says:

    Red Solomon, to whom Hornsby wrote the letter about the tryout, was no stranger: He had been the 13-year-old phenom/mascot for the 1929 Cubs on which Hornsby played. Red remained a standout player through his teens in New York and was already scheduled for a pro tryout when he suffered a devastating leg fracture in a game. Yankees manager Joe McCarthy (who had managed the Cubs) got the team doctors to help with Red’s treatment, and Hornsby visited him in the hospital. This letter came after his recovery, but he never did regain his top form and didn’t get signed. (HT Gary Joseph Cieradkowski, “The League of Outsider Baseball)

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