Tony Conigliaro

Tony Conigliaro
Birthdate 1/7/1945
Death Date 2/24/1990
Debut Year 1964
Year of Induction
Teams Angels, Red Sox
Position Right Field

The youngest MLB home run champion, Tony Conigliaro hit the most homers by a teenager and is the youngest in AL history to hit 100 HRs.

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Tony Conigliaro was one of baseball's brightest stars before getting beaned

Tony Conigliaro was one of baseball's brightest stars before getting beaned

Tony Conigliaro made his big league debut in 1964 at the tender age of 19. The first pitch the Red Sox rookie saw in front of the Fenway faithful he hit over the Green Monster for a homer. During his time as a teenager the Massachusetts native slugged 24 homers – the most by any player before
A pitch by Jack Hamilton essentially ended Tony C's career; Hamilton hit hit just 13 batters in 8 MLB seasons

A pitch by Jack Hamilton essentially ended Tony C's career; Hamilton hit hit just 13 batters in 8 MLB seasons

One fateful pitch forever altered Tony Conigliaro’s baseball career and life. That pitch was thrown by 200-pound right-hander Jack Hamilton. From that day on, Hamilton had a reputation as a headhunter. The reputation couldn’t be further from the truth. Hamilton hit just 13 batters in his

Stories about Tony Conigliaro

Tony Conigliaro was on the path to greatness before beaning

August 14th, 2021 Leave a comment

Tony C

Tony C finds success early Tony Conigliaro made his big league debut in 1964 at the tender age of 19. The first pitch the Red Sox rookie saw in front of the Fenway faithful he hit over the Green Monster for a homer. During his time as a teenager the Massachusetts native slugged 24 homers – the most by any player before his 20th birthday. Conigliaro followed up that performance by swatting a league-leading 32 homers in ’65. At just 20 years old, the right-hander remains Major League Baseball’s youngest home run champion. Tony C had another fine year in ’66. He finished in the top ten among AL batters in triples, homers, total bases, RBI, and OPS. Finally old enough to drink, Conigliaro was on his way to becoming a superstar. The first half of 1967 was more of the same. Selected as the starting right fielder in the All Star game, Conigliaro had the world on a string. Twelve days after the Mid Summer Classic he hit his 100th career homer – the youngest player in American League history to reach the plateau. Then on August 18th, everything changed. The beaning changes everything In the bottom of the […]

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There was no champagne for Red Sox, Lonborg in ‘67

July 20th, 2017 Leave a comment

Lonborg and champagne

World Series championships are won on the field, not in the newspapers. In 1967 the press might’ve given the Cardinals extra motivation in their epic seven-game battle against the Red Sox. Boston wins the pennant on the last day Boston had to grind it out just to get to the postseason. The battle for supremacy in the American League came down to the last day of the regular season. Boston and second-place Detroit were separated by just a half-game. The Tigers had a doubleheader at home against the Angels. The Red Sox played the Twins at Fenway Park. Boston turned to ace Jim Lonborg for the regular season finale. The 1967 Cy Young Award winner, Gentleman Jim responded with a gutty performance. On three days rest he went the distance allowing one earned run before the sellout crowd at Fenway. The October 1st contest was his 15th complete game of the season. The Tigers needed a sweep of California. Detroit won the first game 6-4 but couldn’t contain the Angels in the second, losing 8-5. With the Detroit loss, Boston earned a berth to the World Series against the National Champion St. Louis Cardinals. The World Series begins On only […]

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4 responses to “Tony Conigliaro”

  1. George says:

    It all changed in 1967 for baseball in Boston. The four world championships mean a great deal. But the ’67 team is what especially resonates with me.⚾

  2. Jim Wing says:

    I just think that Tony C. had so much courage coming back from his eye injury. He really had only one good eye left, and he went out at the major league level and battled fly balls in the sun and pitchers throwing at high speeds. I always felt if he was not traded away from his family and support group he would have continued his comeback, but of course will never know.

  3. Billy says:

    What coulda been…

  4. Born to hit a baseball…

    Joe Conigliaro

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"Whoever wants to know the heart and mind of America had better learn baseball…"

~Jacques Barzun, 1954