Vern Stephens

Vern Stephens
Birthdate 10/23/1920
Death Date 11/04/1968
Debut Year 1941
Year of Induction
Teams Browns, Orioles, Red Sox, White Sox
Positions Shortstop, Third Base

An eight-time All Star, Vern Stephens finished in the top 10 in voting for the Most Valuable Player Award six times in his career.

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Vern Stephens was one of the greatest run-producing shortstops of his era

Vern Stephens was one of the greatest run-producing shortstops of his era

Overlooked to be sure, Vern Stephens made for all star teams for the the St. Louis Browns and for more for the Red Sox. A home run champion and three-time RBI leader, he was a rare run-producing shortstop. Six times Stephens topped the 90-RBI mark, four times eclipsing triple-digit totals. Stephens
Stephens' most productive seasons came in Boston hitting behind Ted Williams

Stephens' most productive seasons came in Boston hitting behind Ted Williams

After three all star campaigns in his first 8 seasons with the St. Louis Browns, Stephens was traded to the Red Sox. He hit behind Ted Williams and enjoyed his best offensive seasons. His first four seasons in Boston were spectacular. He averaged 33 homers, 147 RBI, 316 total bases. Stephens’
Vern Stephens' career deserve another look from the Veterans Committee

Vern Stephens' career deserve another look from the Veterans Committee

Vern Stephens played during an era when little offense was expected from the shortstop position. For the ten-year period from 1942-1951, Stephens was an outlier. He averaged 23 homers and 105 RBI. Stephens OPS+ was 123. The middle infielder made 8 all star teams in ten years, receiving MVP votes in

One response to “Vern Stephens”

  1. Al strada says:

    Loved growing in Jersey as kid and seeing the Vern Stephen’s and Phil Rizzutos play in golden age of NY baseball 1947-1957

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