Chick Hafey

Birthdate 2/12/1904
Death Date 7/2/1973
Debut Year 1924
Year of Induction 1971
Teams Cardinals, Reds
Positions Left Field, Outfield

Chick Hafey was the starting left fielder and cleanup hitter in the first All Star game; he also recorded the first hit in All Star competition. 

 

In the collection:

Authentic Art Card signed by Chick Hafey

Authentic Art Card signed by Chick Hafey

Afflicted with bad eyesight and sinus problems throughout his career, Charles “Chick” Hafey battled through his maladies for a career batting average of .317. Hafey played in four Fall Classics from 1926-1931 winning bookend World Series titles. Shown here is an offering from a short-liv
Reverse of Chick Hafey Authentic Art Card

Reverse of Chick Hafey Authentic Art Card

The reverse of the Authentic Art Cards shows the career stats of Chick Hafey and provides a brief explanation of how the cards were produced. Unfortunately the cards never fully took hold with collectors, many of whom felt the process simply ruined a perfectly good autographed index card. Hafey hit
Chick Hafey autographed 3x5 index card

Chick Hafey autographed 3x5 index card

Providing a nice contrast between the Authentic Art Card is this simple autographed index card. Most sizable autograph collection of Hall of Fame members includes many index cards. Most images that come to mind of Hafey include him wearing glasses, almost unheard of for today’s hitters. Of Haf
Former teammate Frank Frisch vows to do a

Former teammate Frank Frisch vows to do a "thorough job" as member of HoF Vets Committee

Chick Hafey’s selection to the Hall of Fame is puzzling. A veteran of 13 MLB campaigns, Hafey played in as many as 100 games in seven seasons. Only twice did he play in as many as 140 games in a year. When it came time for the baseball writers to consider him for the Hall of Fame, Chick Hafey topp

A Story about Chick Hafey

Frankie Frisch’s Vets Committee selections defined and damaged the Hall

January 4th, 2017

Babe Ruth, Hank Aaron, Sandy Koufax, and Cy Young are in everyone’s Hall of Fame. Marginal players like the ones selected on Frankie Frisch’s watch on the Veterans Committee have helped define and damage the Hall of Fame.

His five most glaring selections — George Kelly, Jesse Haines, Dave Bancroft, Ross Youngs, and Chick Hafey have ignited many arguments. Here’s a big reason why: Imagine if your favorite player is Keith Hernandez and you think he should be in Cooperstown. He’s flat out a better first baseman than George Kelly. Hernandez was in fact a better player than any of the five Frisch selections. There are likely hundreds of players better than the Frisch Five.

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