Harry Hooper

cooperstownexpert.com
Birthdate8/24/1887
Death Date12/18/1974
Debut Year1909
Year of Induction1971
Teams Red Sox, White Sox
Position Right Field

A fine defensive outfielder, Harry Hooper is the only member of four separate Red Sox World Series championships — 1912, 1915, 1916, 1918.

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In the collection:

Harry Hooper identifies his greatest thrill and stocks his all-time team with teammates

Harry Hooper identifies his greatest thrill and stocks his all-time team with teammates

Hall of Fame right fielder Harry Hooper enjoyed a 17-year career from 1909-1925. He starred with Boston with Tris Speaker and Duffy Lewis, forming the Golden Outfield that’s considered among the best in baseball history. In this image and the following four Hooper answers a fan’s questio
Harry Hooper writes about his hobbies and what it means being in the Hall of Fame

Harry Hooper writes about his hobbies and what it means being in the Hall of Fame

On the second page of the correspondence, Harry Hooper writes about what it means to him to be in the Hall of Fame, stating, “The pleasure + satisfaction of being recognized as one of Baseballs great outfielders.” Hooper also writes that his hobbies include “hunting + fishing”
Harry Hooper played for the White Sox in 1921; here he writes about the Black Sox scandal

Harry Hooper played for the White Sox in 1921; here he writes about the Black Sox scandal

Harry Hooper played for the Red Rox during the 1919 season. The Boston club finished 20 1/2 games behind the pennant-winning White Sox. Heavily-favored in the World Series. The White Sox lost 5 games to 3 to the underdog Cincinnati Reds. Soon word leaked that Chicago was in cahoots with gamblers and
Harry Hooper predicts how he'll be remembered 100 years later - it's a bleak and inaccurate view

Harry Hooper predicts how he'll be remembered 100 years later - it's a bleak and inaccurate view

On the final page of the correspondence Harry Hooper writes that if not for becoming a baseball player he would’ve been a civil engineer. The eight and final question posed to Hooper is about how he’ll be remembered “100 years from now” Hooper writes, “In far less time than that Harry Hooper will be only a statistic in a record book.”
Here's the envelope Harry Hooper sent his responses in; he signed the return-address portion

Here's the envelope Harry Hooper sent his responses in; he signed the return-address portion

This image shows the envelope that the fan received the written responses from Harry Hooper. The Hall of Fame outfielder has signed the return-address portion in the top left corner, adding his Santa Cruz city in case the envelope needs to be returned. Pieces with the type of content seen in these letters rarely surface on the market. Letters written by
Larry Ritter wrote

Larry Ritter wrote "The Glory of Their Times" & helped Hooper get elected - here's Hooper's 1970 Christmas card to the author

This piece originates from the estate of The Glory of their Times author Larry Ritter. Many believe Ritters landmark book helped Harry Hooper and Rube Marquard gets elected to the Hall of Fame. Here Hooper sends his warm wishes in the form of this Christmas card. At the bottom of the card, Hooper wr

A Story about Harry Hooper

Inducted into Cooperstown’s Honor Rolls of Baseball in 1946, Bill Carrigan managed Boston to back-to-back World Series titles

August 2nd, 2017 Leave a comment

Every summer the baseball world pauses as the Hall of Fame induction weekend puts the village of Cooperstown on display. Players, managers, executives, owners, and umpires who are deemed worthy receive a plaque and along with it, baseball immortality. The election process during the Hall’s infancy bears little resemblance to today. For the first decade of induction, Cooperstown recognized only its players with the exception of pioneer Henry Chadwick. The Hall establishes the Honor Rolls of Baseball Wanting to recognize non-playing personnel, the Hall established the Honor Rolls of Baseball in 1946 as a second level of induction. That year the museum’s Permanent Committee voted to include 39 non-players into the Honor Rolls. Eleven umpires, 11 executives, 12 sportswriters, and 5 managers were inducted. Of the five skippers, four have since gained full induction with plaques in Cooperstown. The lone manager not so recognized is former Red Sox pilot Bill Carrigan. Born in Maine in 1883, Carrigan broke in with Boston in 1906 as a backup catcher. In time he became a favorite of the pitching staff, catching the likes of Cy Young, Bill Dinneen and a young Babe Ruth for the Red Sox. Soon Carrigan was one of the game’s most […]

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"Whoever wants to know the heart and mind of America had better learn baseball…"

~Jacques Barzun, 1954