George Sisler

CooperstownExpert.com
Birthdate 3/24/1893
Death Date 3/26/1973
Debut Year 1915
Year of Induction 1939
Teams Browns, Dodgers, Senators
Positions First Base, Pitcher

In 1920, George Sisler hit .407 and set a record with 257 hits. His mark would stand until Ichiro Suzuki amassed 262 knocks in 2004. 

 

In the collection:

Handwritten letter from George Sisler

Handwritten letter from George Sisler

Only five players in the history of Major League Baseball have hit .400 twice in a season. “Gentleman George” Sisler did so by hitting ..407 in 1920 and .420 in 1922. With a lifetime average of .340, Sisler is joined by Ed Delehanty, Ty Cobb, Rogers Hornsby, and Jesse Burkett in the mult
George Sisler and Ichiro Suzuki signed 3x5

George Sisler and Ichiro Suzuki signed 3x5

George Sisler hit .407 in the 1920 season in which he set the Major League record with 257 hits. Gorgeous George lived the rest of his days as the record holder before passing away in March of 1973. Seven months later Ichiro Suzuki was born in Japan. Suzuki would grow up to cross the ocean, play in
MLB's Dave Sisler writes about his father George

MLB's Dave Sisler writes about his father George

A veteran of seven big league seasons himself, pitcher Dave Sisler writes about his father Hall of Famer George Sisler in this handwritten letter. “I talked to my father many times about his career…I think he felt that if he had not had that eye trouble, he could have surpassed Ty Cobb&#
George Sisler is HoFer Harry Hooper's choice on the best-hitting first baseman on his all-time team

George Sisler is HoFer Harry Hooper's choice on the best-hitting first baseman on his all-time team

When a fan wrote to Hall of Fame outfielder Harry Hooper and asked him to identify his all-time team, Hooper gladly responded. His choices are dominated by former teammates. Red Sox catcher-manager Bill Carrigan was Hooper’s choice for both spots. So too were Boston outfield teammates Tris Spe
Envelope containing Harry Hooper's responses - he signed the top left corner

Envelope containing Harry Hooper's responses - he signed the top left corner

The previous letter in which Harry Hooper identified George Sisler as his choice for the best-hitting first baseman on his all-time team arrived in this envelope. Notice Hooper’s signature in the return address portion. The question of his all time team was one of only 8 queries that Hooper wrote about. His insightful reflections about the Black Sox scandal,
Seventeen days after George Sisler's death his family responds to a condolence

Seventeen days after George Sisler's death his family responds to a condolence

After Hall of Fame first baseman George Sisler passed away on March 23, 1973, the family received an outpouring of condolences from people across America. One such person was Jack Marcus of Virginia. Shown here is a thank-you note from the Sisler family to Marcus along with the original mailing envelope. Postmarked just 17 days after the slugger’s death,
Letter from George Sisler Jr. responding to Jack Marcus' request for pictures of Sisler Sr.

Letter from George Sisler Jr. responding to Jack Marcus' request for pictures of Sisler Sr.

Nearly two years after the death of .400 hitter George Sisler his son still received requests for pictures and autographs of the Hall of Famer. In the collection is this letter from George Sisler Jr. who at that time was president of the International League. Sisler Jr. writes to collector Jack Marc
George Sisler Hall of Fame plaque postcard signed by son George Sisler Jr.

George Sisler Hall of Fame plaque postcard signed by son George Sisler Jr.

In the collection is this Hall of Fame plaque postcard of George Sisler who twice had batting averages over .400. Sisler’s son, George Jr. has signed the back of the card. The younger Sisler made quite a name for himself in baseball. A GM for three Minor League clubs, Sisler won the Internatio

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"Whoever wants to know the heart and mind of America had better learn baseball…"

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