Harvey Haddix

Harvey Haddix
Birthdate 09/18/1925
Death Date 01/08/1994
Debut Year 1952
Year of Induction
Teams Cardinals, Orioles, Phillies, Pirates, Reds
Position Pitcher

Remembered for his 12-inning perfect game, Harvey Haddix won 136 games, was a 3X All Star & Gold Glover & a pitching coach for 14 years.

 

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In the collection:

Harvey Haddix pitched the longest perfect game in MLB history

Harvey Haddix pitched the longest perfect game in MLB history

Though there have been hundreds of MLB no-hitters, a perfect game remains one of the game’s rarest achievements. As of the start of the 2021 season, the big leagues have seen only 21. The number climbs to 23 if you count such games when the pitching distance was 45 feet. Don Larsen’s gem
Harvey Haddix's pitched his 12-inning gem against a formidable lineup

Harvey Haddix's pitched his 12-inning gem against a formidable lineup

The date was May 26, 1959. Harvey Haddix faced a Milwaukee Braves lineup with a pair of Hall of Famer sluggers who would each tally more than 500 homers. Joining Hank Aaron and Eddie Mathews in the lineup were cleanup man Joe Adcock and Andy Pafko batting fifth.
Haddix should be remembered for more than the one game

Haddix should be remembered for more than the one game

Fans today remember Harvey Haddix for his near-perfect game in 1959. It’s easy to forget he was a three-time All Star with three Gold Gloves to his credit. A 20-game winner in 1953, Haddix won 136 games in his 14-year big league career. Shown here is Haddix’s lifetime pass from the early
The rarest form of lifetime passes is leather like this one

The rarest form of lifetime passes is leather like this one

Many lifetime passes remain in the family long after a player has passed away, others are donated to the Hall of Fame. The pass shown above is an ultra-rare leather pass. Internet searches yield little or no information about passes of the leather variety. The recipient of this one, Harvey Haddix mi
After his playing career, Haddix became a successful pitching coach

After his playing career, Haddix became a successful pitching coach

After his 14-year Major League career was over, Haddix became a pitching coach for five teams for 14 more seasons. This autographed card shows him as pitching coach with the Pirates, a job that would be his last in baseball and would span from 1979-1984, giving him his second World Series ring. His
Haddix worked in professional baseball from 1947 until 1984

Haddix worked in professional baseball from 1947 until 1984

Harvey Haddix signed with the Cardinals as a 17-year old in 1947. and pitched professionally until he was 39 years old. After retiring in 1965, Haddix became a successful pitching coach for the next two decades. He started in pro ball in ’47 and left the game in 1984. The pass shown above migh

A Story about Harvey Haddix

Lifetime passes were the brainchild of NL President Ford Frick; here’s a pictorial history

June 18th, 2016 Leave a comment

Lifetime pass

A newspaper man turned league publicist turned league president came up with a brilliant idea in 1934 — reward longtime National League players with a lifetime pass to all NL games. Senior Circuit owners approved Ford Frick’s proposal at the league meeting in December of ’34. A few months later, Frick sent out ornately decorated paper Lifetime Passes to the NL’s greatest players. He even sent one to Babe Ruth who appeared in all of 28 games for the Boston Braves in 1935. A 21-year veteran of the American League, the Babe was grateful if not surprised when he remarked, “At least the National League has a heart”. An image of the original paper pass presented to Hall of Fame outfielder Sliding Billy Hamilton can be seen below. A similar pass curiously issued to Stan Coveleski, a lifetime American Leaguer is also shown. Perhaps shamed by Ruth’s remarks, the American League joined forces in 1936 to issue a pass to all Major League contests. Players with twenty or more years of service received a solid gold pass. Seventeen men qualified for the true “golden ticket” — Ruth, Fred Clarke, Ty Cobb, Eddie Collins, Bill Dahlen, Harry Davis, Red Faber, Walter Johnson, […]

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"Whoever wants to know the heart and mind of America had better learn baseball…"

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