Frank Robinson

Birthdate 8/31/1935
Death Date 2/7/2019
Debut Year 1956
Year of Induction 1982
Teams Angels, Dodgers, Indians, Orioles, Reds
Position Right Field

Frank Robinson was MLB’s first African-American manager. In 1974, his first at bat as player/manager for the Indians, he hit a home run.

 

In the collection:

Robinson won the Triple Crown in 1966

Robinson won the Triple Crown in 1966

Frank Robinson won his only batting championship in 1966, a year in which he won the Triple Crown, AL MVP, and World Series MVP. Shown here is a Topps batting leaders card autographed by the top three finishers, Robinson, Tony Oliva, and Al Kaline.
Lineup card from Cal Ripken's streak signed by Frank Robinson as manager

Lineup card from Cal Ripken's streak signed by Frank Robinson as manager

When Frank Robinson finished his career with 585 homers, only Hank Aaron, Babe Ruth, and Willie Mays had more round trippers. The only man to win an MVP in each league, Robinson  was a first-ballot Hall of Famer. He was also a
Back of the lineup card shows the Yankee Stadium ground rules

Back of the lineup card shows the Yankee Stadium ground rules

This is the actual card that Frank Robinson carried in his pocket during the contest in New York against the Yankees. Notice the fold marks through the center of the card. Visiting manager’s lineup cards are preprinted with the stadium ground rules.
Autographed 1962 Topps card of Milt Pappas, the centerpiece of the deal that brought Robinson to Baltimore

Autographed 1962 Topps card of Milt Pappas, the centerpiece of the deal that brought Robinson to Baltimore

Remembering Milt Pappas as the primary figure in the trade the brought Frank Robinson from Cincinnati to Baltimore certainly sells the pitcher short. Born Miltiades Stergios Papastergios, Pappas won 110 games in Baltimore during his first nine big league seasons,  pitching in the All Star game in

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"Whoever wants to know the heart and mind of America had better learn baseball…"

~Jacques Barzun, 1954