Joe Sewell

Birthdate 10/9/1898
Death Date 3/6/1990
Debut Year 1920
Year of Induction 1977
Teams Indians, Yankees
Positions Shortstop, Third Base

Joe Sewell went 115 straight games without striking out. He also struck out on average only once every 63 at bats. Both are MLB records.

In the collection:

Joe Sewell's solid silver lifetime pass

Joe Sewell's solid silver lifetime pass

Imagine having a pass that gives you admission to any regular season Major League game for life. That’s what Joe Sewell had in this solid silver lifetime pass. By virtue of having played ten or more years by 1934, Sewell was among the first players to receive the gift. A master of bat control
Sewell handwritten letter re: Ruth's called shot

Sewell handwritten letter re: Ruth's called shot

One of the most mythical events in baseball history came during Game 3 of the 1932 World Series. Did Babe Ruth call his shot? Joe Sewell was there that day and was asked to recount his memory of the event. Did it happen? “Yes,” Sewell writes. “I hit ahead of Babe in the lineup, sec
Page 2 of letter about Ruth's called shot

Page 2 of letter about Ruth's called shot

Joe Sewell was certain The Bambino did call his shot in the World Series. On page two of his handwritten letter on the subject, Sewell continues, “…after he got two strikes he backed out of the batters box with his bat in his left hand. With two fingers on his right hand he pointed to ce
Joe Sewell autographed 1933 Goudey - his last MLB season

Joe Sewell autographed 1933 Goudey - his last MLB season

Goudey Gum Company’s iconic 1933 baseball card set is on display here complete with Joe Sewell’s autograph on this original vintage card. Sewell spent his first 11 years playing for the Cleveland Indians before signing with the Yankees as a free agent before the 1931 season. His first Wo
Joe Sewell agrees to be on Babe Ruth advisory board

Joe Sewell agrees to be on Babe Ruth advisory board

In 1977 Hall of Fame third baseman Brooks Robinson mailed current and former stars of the game requesting their consent to lend their name to the Babe Ruth Foundation Advisory Board. Dated the same year as his induction into the Hall, Sewell responds by writing, “I was on the Yankee Ball Club wi
Handwritten letter from Joe Sewell's cousin Rip Sewell re: Eephus pitch

Handwritten letter from Joe Sewell's cousin Rip Sewell re: Eephus pitch

The Sewell family has quite an association with Major League Baseball. Not only is Joe Sewell in the Hall of Fame, but his brothers Luke and Tommy both played in the big leagues as did cousin Rip Sewell, the originator of the eephus pitch. In this handwritten letter from February 14, 1978 Rip Sewell
Joe Sewell says Bobby Veach belongs in the Hall of Fame

Joe Sewell says Bobby Veach belongs in the Hall of Fame

In this handwritten letter, Hall of Fame infielder Joe Sewell weighs in on the Hall of Fame debate regarding Bobby Veach. The former Tiger outfielder, Veach led all of Major League Baseball in runs batted in and extra base hits from 1915-1922. The three-time AL RBI leader, Veach finished with a .310 lifetime average. Is that enough to gain induction to Cooperstown?
Former Commissioner Happy Chandler agrees with Sewell's assessment of Veach

Former Commissioner Happy Chandler agrees with Sewell's assessment of Veach

Bobby Veach’s statistical case for inclusion in Cooperstown is strong. A .310 lifetime average speaks loudly as do his three seasons of leading the AL in RBI. For the eight-year period spanning 1915-1922, Veach led all of baseball in extra-base hits and runs batted in. Like Joe Sewell, basebal

A Story about Joe Sewell

Lifetime passes were the brainchild of NL President Ford Frick; here’s a pictorial history

June 18th, 2016

Lifetime pass

A newspaper man turned league publicist turned league president came up with a brilliant idea in 1934 — reward longtime National League players with a lifetime pass to all NL games. Senior Circuit owners approved Ford Frick’s proposal at the league meeting in December of ’34. A few months later, Frick sent out ornately decorated paper Lifetime Passes to the NL’s greatest players. He even sent one to Babe Ruth who appeared in all of 28 games for the Boston Braves in 1935. A 21-year veteran of the American League, the Babe was grateful if not surprised when he remarked, “At least the National League has a heart”. An image of the original paper pass presented to Hall of Fame outfielder Sliding Billy Hamilton can be seen below. A similar pass curiously issued to Stan Coveleski, a lifetime American Leaguer is also shown. Perhaps shamed by Ruth’s remarks, the American League joined forces in 1936 to issue a pass to all Major League contests. Players with twenty or more years of service received a solid gold pass. Seventeen men qualified for the true “golden ticket” — Ruth, Fred Clarke, Ty Cobb, Eddie Collins, Bill Dahlen, Harry Davis, Red Faber, Walter Johnson, […]

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"Whoever wants to know the heart and mind of America had better learn baseball…"

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