Vin Scully

Vin Scully
Birthdate 11/29/1927
Death Date
Debut Year 1950
Year of Induction 1982
Teams Dodgers, MLB
Position Announcer

Considered by most to be the greatest sportscaster of all time, Vin Scully called Dodger games from 1950-2016, a record 67 seasons.

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Vin Scully joined Ruth, McGraw, Mack, Musial, Mays, Maddux and 50 Hall of Famers as a recipient of the Slocum Award

Vin Scully joined Ruth, McGraw, Mack, Musial, Mays, Maddux and 50 Hall of Famers as a recipient of the Slocum Award

Vin Scully called more baseball games than any announcer in the history of the game. Starting in Brooklyn in 1950, moving to Los Angeles with the team eight years later, Scully remained with the Dodgers until 2016. It was a record 67 years, all with one club. Along the way, the
Scully's high school classmate and future MLB player Larry Miggins talks about their dream come true

Scully's high school classmate and future MLB player Larry Miggins talks about their dream come true

Vin Scully announced 28 World Series and 21 no-hitters, none of which included his personal favorite play call. That came in a 14-8 Dodger win on May 13, 1952. To understand the magnitude of the otherwise nondescript game, we have to back to Scully’s time in high school. A conversation in the
Vin Scully started with Brooklyn in 1950 and remained the voice of the Dodgers for 67 seasons

Vin Scully started with Brooklyn in 1950 and remained the voice of the Dodgers for 67 seasons

Vin Scully began his big league announcing career with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1950. Little did he know that he’d stay with the team for 67 years. One of Scully’s favorite Brooklyn players was the great Gil Hodges. The Dodger announcer always maintained that the first baseman deserved a
In 2001, the Dodgers named their press box in honor of Vin Scully

In 2001, the Dodgers named their press box in honor of Vin Scully

On April 21, 2001 the Dodgers named their press box in honor of the greatest baseball announcer of all time, Vin Scully. Shown here is a press release announcing the ceremony. A luminous sign that reads “Vin Scully Press Box” was erected near the door to the box. As part of the ceremony, the Dodgers also unveiled the “Wall of Fame” in the
Scully climbed a ladder to unviel the sign outside the press box now named after him

Scully climbed a ladder to unviel the sign outside the press box now named after him

Vin Scully is shown here touching the sign that bears his name near the entrance of the Dodger Stadium press box. The event took place on April 21, 2001 with the then-73 year old Scully climbing a ladder to pull off a curtain and reveal the sign. Scully has signed and dated this photo. It is person
Scully walks down the press box

Scully walks down the press box "Wall of Fame", dedicated on April 21, 2001

In addition to naming the Dodger press box, the team also unveiled the “Walk of Fame”. It is located in the hallway that leads from the entrance of the press box to the main seating area. In the collection is this picture of Vin Scully on the day of the Walk of Fame dedication. The Dodge
Don Zimmer earned a ring with the '55 Dodgers; here he reflects on Vin Scully's Hall of Fame career

Don Zimmer earned a ring with the '55 Dodgers; here he reflects on Vin Scully's Hall of Fame career

Shown here and in the next two images is the Dodger press release announcing Vin Scully’s return for his 63rd season. Lifelong baseball man Don Zimmer pens his thoughts at the bottom of the release. Zim writes, “To think that Vinny and I started out in Brooklyn all those many years ago a
Brooklyn great Carl Erskine compares Scully to mentor announcer Red Barber

Brooklyn great Carl Erskine compares Scully to mentor announcer Red Barber

Here Brooklyn hurler Carl Erskine compares Vin Scully to the announcer’s mentor Red Barber. Erskine writes, “I first met Vince Scully in 1950 – he was fresh out of Fordham Univ. I immediately looked at his red hair and said, ‘This kid is a pup out of Red Barber.’ How prophetic. In fact, Vin has been all
Former Dodger Tommy Hutton reflects on hearing Vin Scully announce his games

Former Dodger Tommy Hutton reflects on hearing Vin Scully announce his games

Twelve-year big league veteran Tommy Hutton signed with the Dodgers as an 18-year old 1964. Tommy Lasorda, then a scout for the team, took a look at Hutton based on a tip from a parking lot attendant. Hutton grew up in South Pasadena, just a few miles from Chavez Ravine. The parking lot attendant wa
CooperstownExpert.com's Jim Smiley covered the Dodgers for 23 years

CooperstownExpert.com's Jim Smiley covered the Dodgers for 23 years

CooperstownExpert.com’s Jim Smiley covered the Dodgers for 23 years. In that time he got to know Vin Scully. The Dodger announcer was as kind in person as he seemed on the air. How well did Scully know Smiley? “Vin was always so friendly and approachable to everyone in the press box,R
Jimmy Smiley's first MLB game included time with the greatest announcer of all time, Vin Scully

Jimmy Smiley's first MLB game included time with the greatest announcer of all time, Vin Scully

While covering the Dodgers in 1997, Jim Smiley took his five-month old son to his first base game. This picture shows son Jimmy and wife Mashitah at that September 21st, 1997 contest. Scully loved children. When Smiley and his wife came in with their son, Scully asked, “Would you mind if I hel
The little boy in the picture with Scully ended up pitching for the alma mater of Eddie Collins and Lou Gehrig in the Ivy League

The little boy in the picture with Scully ended up pitching for the alma mater of Eddie Collins and Lou Gehrig in the Ivy League

Jimmy Smiley got his first taste of baseball at Dodgers Stadium as a five-month old infant. Soon he developed a lifelong love of baseball. Smiley and his brother Will grew up surrounded by the game, playing it since they were four years old. Both boys starred in high school.

Stories about Vin Scully

The William J. Slocum Award is one of MLB’s most prestigious honors

October 3rd, 2020 Leave a comment

Vin Scully was presented the prestigious Slocum Award in 1995

The oldest professional sport in the United States, baseball remains America’s National Pastime to this day. The game’s current leagues were flourishing soon after the end of the 1800s. Every city with a team had multiple newspapers reporting their games. Sportswriters worked from stadium press boxes describing their team’s contests in great detail. The widespread news coverage helped grow the game.
In 1908 writers banded together to form the Baseball Writers Association of America. The BBWAA’s founding mission was to “ensure professional working conditions for beat writers at all MLB ballparks and to promote uniformity of scoring methods.
Early in the 1900s New York City boasted three big league teams, the Giants and Dodgers of the National League, and the Highlanders – who later became the Yankees – in the American League. The Big Apple soon became the hub of the baseball world.
One of the writers who covered the New York teams was William J. Slocum. Respected for his baseball knowledge and writing ability, Slocum quickly rose to the top of his profession. Well-liked, he helped organize the New York chapter of the BBWAA.
The Bill Slocom Award is one of the most prestigious awards baseball has to offer. The little-known honor has been given to more than 50 members of the Hall of Fame.

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Vin Scully and high school teammate Larry Miggins shared a magical MLB moment

May 12th, 2020 Leave a comment

Vin Scully and Larry Miggins attended the same high school

Scully & MLB’s Miggins played ball together in high school During the second semester of the 1943 school year, Fordham Prep High School baseball teammates Larry Miggins and Vin Scully sat in their school’s auditorium sharing dreams of reaching the big leagues. While Miggins fancied himself as a future Major League player, Scully hoped to become a big league baseball announcer. The two men created a dream scenario that would come true on May 13, 1952 at Brooklyn’s Ebbets Field. Miggins tells the story “Vince Scully and I were attending Fordham Prep in 1943,” Miggins wrote in a letter. “At a school assembly he was sitting behind me, grabbed me by the shoulders and said, ‘Larry someday you will be in the big leagues and the first time you hit a home run, I will be the announcer and tell the world about it.’ “Sure enough it happened in 1952. I was with the Cardinals and the first time we played in NY – my home town – Eddie Stanky put me in left field and I hit a home run (my first) off of Preacher Roe and beat him for the first time in two years. Scully had joined […]

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